Author-mentors?

Hi Dabbleworld,

I’m curious about your mentors and the authors that you admire and respect the most. They don’t necessarily have to have written your favorite books, but perhaps they’ve influenced your choices or provided instruction that’s helped you advance your writing.

I feel that I’ve absorbed a lot through a lifetime of reading, but on the other hand, I lack solid instruction (still getting my head around plot grids!) and I’m thinking about taking a class. I just found this series by author Michelle Richmond that looks enticing (I like the tone of her blog posts) and this made me curious if anyone here had someone else to recommend?

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I love watching Jenna Morecci on YouTube. She’s got some good advice, though I’ve never really read any of her works.

But I don’t really have any mentors.

I’ve worked through several of Randy Ingermanson who uses the snowflake method and other advice.

KM Weiland is another I follow pretty avidly though I’ve never read any of her works either.

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KM Weiland is one I love too. She’s much more of a plotter than I am, but I love absorbing what’s on her site and twisting it to work for me.
I haven’t read any of her works either but perhaps it would be intresting to see what the method she talks about puts out.

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Adding my vote for K.M. Weiland! Also, Stephen King (his book On Writing is a classic) and Chuck Wendig (I haven’t read his fiction, but his non-fiction books for writers are entertaining and I follow his blog avidly.)

As far as potential classes, I believe Brian Sanderson (I think is his name, I’m drawing a blank) has some of of his writing lectures on YouTube.

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Brandon Sanderson does :slight_smile: I think it’s called Writing Excuses but I could be wrong, I haven’t watched/listened to any myself tho.

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There are many excellent mentors and instructors. K.M. Weiland and Jessica Brody are great for genre works. Hemingway’s insightful book on writing fiction.

I’ve always wanted to write a literary piece. And I wondered if I could find a class in which the teacher took a semester(s) and wrote a novel while the class observed and asked questions after. Not only talking about structure, theme, plot, etc. but be a fly on the wall as an author writes from start to finish.

I discovered Robert Olen Butler’s free seventeen 2-hr lessons (YouTube or at his website) in which he starts with a postcard photograph and writes a short novel in his home office. It’s 34 hours of video, but you are with a Pulitzer prize-winning author as he creates a short novel from an initial emotional connection with an image to a finished product. He is not an outliner. He writes and edits from the first sentence. He’s an example of an extreme pantser. I looked at his books. The process definitely works for him. He’s written genre thrillers, romance, mysteries, and literary works.

During the class, he pulls back and tells us what he’s doing here and there. A lot of the video is on his computer screen. So you see the word choices and syntax and why. He writes about 500 words in each two-hour session.

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Sanderson, Mary Robinette Kowal, Dan Wells, and Howard Taylor put out a great podcast. 15-20 minute episodes. (edit: The podcast is called Writing Excuses.) Huge backlist with season themes. They seem to be weekly. They recommend starting with season 10 as they really hit their stride and covered things better. Highly recommended.

Joanna Penn for those interested in being an independent author (not working with a publishing house, she distinguishes it from self-publishing). She does fiction and non-fiction. She has tons of podcasts (I’m a patreon and get a second podcast of hers that way). If you are interested in controlling your publishing destiny, she is your starting point. She does not bash traditional publishing as she knows that works for many people. Just not her.

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Hi

I started with this free course then ended up woth a degree!

I thoroughly recommend it

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I love the Writing Excuses podcast!!

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On YouTube I subscribe to Abbie Emmons - she’s my favourite and her YA book was excellent.

I would then have to agree with AJ - Jenna Morecci, K M Weiland and Brandon Sanderson are all great.

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My mentors are definitely Reedsy, Abbie Emmons, Ellen Brock, Diane Callahan, Hello Future Me, K M Weiland, and Jessica Brody.